The following graphs display how the number of hours an individual spends on a specific activity affects their mood. The first graph (figure A) displays the number of hours someone spends on a specific activity and their mood. The second graph (figure B) displays the change in mood for an individual who is increasing the amount of time they spend on this same task, based on how many waking hours are spent completing it. The graphs show that there is not three-way interaction between days where individuals have more than nine hours per day to complete tasks, as well as when people increased their time spent during these activities by one hour with each subsequent week. Therefore, Dr. Elder should conclude that there was not a significant difference in results for those groups after conducting his study.

Conclusion: As we can see from figure A and Figure B above, there is not a significant difference in the effect on mood when individuals have more than nine hours per day to complete tasks, as well as when people increased their time spent during these activities by one hour with each subsequent week. Conclusion: As we can see from figure A and Figure B above, there is not a significant difference in the effect on mood when individuals have more than nine hours per day to complete tasks, as well as when people increased their time spent during these activities by one hour with each subsequent week. Therefore, Dr. Elder should conclude that there was no three-way interaction between days where individuals had more than nine hours to spend completing tasks and those who were increasing their workloads over consecutive weeks because his study did not show any

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